POG 324: Global Political Economy




Course Description
The study of global political economy involves theoretical debate surrounding the nature and
growing complexity of political and economic power relations among actors including states and
international organizations: intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations,
and multinational corporations. Theoretical perspectives (neomercantilism, liberalism,
constructivism, neo-Marxism, feminism, and environmentalism) are introduced and critically
reviewed. Also examined are processes (such as globalization), trans-border economic
relationships, and global issues (such as global trade, global financial crises, and development).
Specific examples will be drawn from the political economy of South Asia.
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Course Details
Teaching Methods
The course will be taught asynchronously, where lecture materials will be posted in PowerPoint
format with pre-recorded embedded audio for each slide. Supplementary videos and links to case
studies may also be nested within the PowerPoint presentations. Each lecture will be posted as
a weekly announcement and may be revised. Students are responsible for reviewing and
monitoring the announcements tabs for any updates or changes. As other tutorial or
assignment details are required, additional PowerPoint presentations with embedded audio will
be posted.
Discussion questions will also be released each week and students will be required to respond to
the question posed and engage two or more colleagues (respectfully) in order to broaden their
perspective on the issue of the week. Students are responsible for monitoring the discussion
posts page, release dates and due dates. Student responses to posts (along with responses to
their peers) will be an important component of overall evaluation.
A written assignment, mid-term examination and final examination will also be part of the
evaluation and will be detailed later in the outline.
Course Materials
The following text is required for this course as concepts from the core lecture, assignment and
exam material will be drawn from it:
• Textbook: Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. Global Political Economy: Theory & Practice. Taylor &
Francis. Available at Ryerson’s Bookstore.
In addition to material from this text, students are recommended to read journal articles, book
chapters and/or reports which are detailed in the outline and available through E Reserves. All
reading material for the course will be available on the D2L course site.
The readings are an essential part of the course. If students do not feel they have time to read
the weekly material or do not want to commit time to reading then they should reconsider taking
the course. As a senior undergraduate course, students are expected to engage the readings and
actively incorporate methods, ideas and debates into their assignment work, discussion posts
and test responses. This will be essential to be considered for an ‘A’ grade.
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To guide critical reading and support discussion threads, students are asked to consider the
following questions when completing the readings (and preparing for their annotated
bibliographies which will contain article critiques):
• What is the main thesis or argument being presented?
• What are the theoretical and policy implications?
• Why is the reading interesting, useful or significant?
• What is missing from the analysis?
• Are there assumptions made from the perspective of ‘northern’ approaches?
All other assigned readings are posted on the course D2L web site. It is expected that students
will keep current on issues relating to political economy (specifically at the global level) and
current events. The application of course readings and concepts to understanding current events
is central to this course. Lecture files (audio) will likely draw on current events and case studies
and as such, attentiveness and note taking from asynchronous course materials is invaluable!
I will be happy to suggest additional readings at the request of students, especially if students
have specific regional settings which they are interested in exploring. Given the scope of the
course, it is impossible to include all the material that would be suitable. There are many, many
excellent books and articles that are not listed here. There are also many networks and
associations engaged in the study of municipal development and management, which students
should become familiar with. In preparation for graduate school, international work, policy
analysis and the next stage of your careers, do consider building a library of references and
networks starting now.
Course Learning Outcomes
Throughout the course, students will be introduced to the analytical approaches and debates
surrounding the nature and arrangements of political and economic actors. The complexity of
global arrangements is examined through an analysis of the units of states, international
organizations, intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations and
multinational organizations. Theoretical perspectives (neomercantilism, liberalism,
constructivism, neo-Marxism, feminism and environmentalism) are all introduced and critically
reviewed. Specific cases and processes are also examined, including regionalism and
globalization, trans-border economic relationships, and global issues (such as global trade, global
financial crises and development). Over the course of the term, students will understand the
context, theory and practice of policy research and policy-making in relation to the dynamics
which frame global political and economic arrangements. Part of the learning will emerge from
discussion posts and engagement a well as tests and a major written assignment.
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Plagiarism Detection and Virtual Proctoring
All requirements for evaluation will require submission through Turnitin, as per university policy
and guidelines. As all tests are take home and open book, they will be required to demonstrate
rigorous research methods and originality.
Turnitin
Turnitin.com is a plagiarism prevention and detection service to which Ryerson subscribes. It is a
tool to assist instructors in determining the similarity between students’ work and the work of
other students who have submitted papers to the site (at any university), internet sources, and a
wide range of books, journals and other publications. While it does not contain all possible
sources, it gives instructors some assurance that students’ work is their own. No decisions are
made by the service; it generates an “originality report,” which instructors must evaluate to judge
if something is plagiarized.
Students agree by taking this course that their written work will be subject to submission for
textual similarity review to Turnitin.com. Instructors can opt to have student’s papers included
in the Turnitin.com database or not. Use of the Turnitin.com service is subject to the terms-ofuse agreement posted on the Turnitin.com website. Students who do not want their work
submitted to this plagiarism detection service must, by the end of the second week of class,
consult with their instructor to make alternate arrangements.
Even when an instructor has not indicated that a plagiarism detection service will be used, or
when a student has opted out of the plagiarism detection service, if the instructor has reason to
suspect that an individual piece of work has been plagiarized, the instructor is permitted to
submit that work in a non-identifying way to any plagiarism detection service.
Acknowledgement
The preparation of this outline has drawn from course material previously taught by Professor
Sorpong Peou. I am indebted to Professor Peou and the Department of Politics and Public
Administration for permitting me to build on this material in delivering course content.
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Topics and Lecture Schedule
Note: Students are responsible for staying up to date with all course announcements (lectures
will be posted as announcements) and discussion posts via D2L following each class. Extensions
or changes to due dates may be posted to D2L and as such, students should refer to the
assignment submission page on D2L should any discrepancies appear. The due date outlined on
D2L will stand as the most up to date deadline.
While the T.H. Cohn is the only required reading, the rest of the readings are recommended and
posted on the D2L site. Lectures may draw upon these additional readings, so review of lecture
material is a must. Students desiring an ‘A’ grade are strongly advised to engage the
recommended readings.

  1. Course Overview & Historical Background
    a. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. Introduction and Overview 1&2 in Global Political Economy.
    b. Benjamin J. Cohen, “The Multiple Traditions of American IPE.” In The Routledge Handbook
    of International Political Economy, edited by Mark Blyth (New York: Routledge, 2009): 23-
    35.
    c. Robert Gilpin, “The Study of International Political Economy.” In Robert Gilpin, Global
    Political Economy: Understanding the International Economic Order (Princeton, NJ:
    Princeton University Press, 2001): 77-102.
    d. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. Managing the Global Economy since World War II: The
    Institutional Framework. In Global Political Economy.
    e. Robert Gilpin, “The New Global Economic Order.” In Robert Gilpin, Global Political
    Economy: Understanding the International Economic Order (Princeton, NJ: Princeton
    University Press, 2001): 13-15.
    f. Randall Germain, “Of Margins, Traditions, and Engagements: a Brief Disciplinary History of
    IPE in Canada.” In The Routledge Handbook of International Political Economy, edited by
    Mark Blyth (New York: Routledge, 2009): 77-92.
  2. Neo-mercantilist Perspectives
    a. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. 3-Neomercantilism. In Global Political Economy.
    b. Jonathan Kirshner, “Realist Political Economy: Traditional Themes and Contemporary
    Challenges.” In The Routledge Handbook of International Political Economy, edited by
    Mark Blyth (New York: Routledge, 2009): 48-61.
    c. Robert Gilpin, “My Perspective: State-Centric Realism.” In Robert Gilpin, Global Political
    Economy: Understanding the International Economic Order (Princeton, NJ: Princeton
    University Press, 2001): 15-22.
    d. Robert Gilpin, “Theory of Hegemonic Stability.” In Robert Gilpin, Global Political Economy:
    Understanding the International Economic Order (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University
    Press, 2001): 93-96.
    Page 5 of 12
  3. Liberal Perspectives
    a. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. 4-Liberalism. In Global Political Economy.
    b. Alexander Cooley, “Contested Contracts: Rationalist Theories of Institutions in American
    IPE.” In The Routledge Handbook of International Political Economy, edited by Mark Blyth
    (New York: Routledge, 2009): 48-61.
    c. Robert Keohane, “International Institutions: Can Interdependence Work?” Foreign Policy
    (Spring 1998): 82-96.
    d. Robert Keohane, After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy
    (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1984)
  4. Critical Theory Perspectives & Take Home Mid Term (Due Feb 12th)
    a. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. 5-Critical Perspectives. In Global Political Economy.
    b. Rawi Abdelal, “Constructivism as an Approach to International Political Economy.” In The
    Routledge Handbook of International Political Economy, edited by Mark Blyth (New York:
    Routledge, 2009): 62-76.
    c. Bill Dunn, “Theories of Global Political Economy.” In Bill Dunn, Global Political Economy: A
    Marxist Critique (London: Pluto Press, 2009)
    d. Robert Cox, “Political Economy and World Order: Problems of Power and Knowledge at
    the Turn of the Millennium.” In Political Economy and the Changing Global Order, edited
    by Richard Stubbs and Geoffrey R. D. Underhill (Ontario, Canada: Oxford University Press,
    2000): 25-37.
    e. Stephen Gill, “Knowledge, Politics, and Neo-Liberal Political Economy.” In Political
    Economy and the Changing Global Order, edited by Richard Stubbs and Geoffrey R. D.
    Underhill (Ontario, Canada: Oxford University Press, 2000): 48-59.
    Study Week: February 15th to 19th
  5. Global Monetary Issues
    a. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. International Monetary Relations. In Global Political Economy.
    b. Robert Gilpin, “The International Monetary System.” In Robert Gilpin, Global Political
    Economy: Understanding the International Economic Order (Princeton, NJ: Princeton
    University Press, 2001): 234-60.
    c. Jacqueline Best, “Bringing Power Back In: The IMF’s Constructivist Strategy in Critical
    Perspective.” In Constructing the International Economy, edited by Rawi Abdelal and Mark
    Blyth and Craig Parsons (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2010): 194-210.
    d. Bill Dunn, “Money and Finance.” In Bill Dunn, Global Political Economy: A Marxist Critique
    (London: Pluto Press, 2009): 194-210.
    Page 6 of 12
  6. Global Financial Issues
    a. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. Financial Crises. In Global Political Economy.
    b. Robert Gilpin, “The International Financial System.” In Robert Gilpin, Global Political
    Economy: Understanding the International Economic Order (Princeton, NJ: Princeton
    University Press, 2001): 261-277.
    c. Bill Dunn, “Money and Finance.” In Bill Dunn, Global Political Economy: A Marxist Critique
    (London: Pluto Press, 2009)
    d. Spike Peterson, “International Financial System” In A Critical Rewriting of Global Political
    Economy: Integrating Reproductive, Productive and Virtual Economies(London: Routledge,
    2003): 122-31.
  7. Global Trade Issues
    a. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. Global Trade Relations. In Global Political Economy
    b. Robert Gilpin, “The Trading System.” In Robert Gilpin, Global Political Economy:
    Understanding the International Economic Order (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University
    Press, 2001): 196-233
    c. Bill Dunn, “Trade.” In Bill Dunn, Global Political Economy: A Marxist Critique (London:
    Pluto Press, 2009)
    d. Khan, S.R., 2009, ‘Regional Trade Integration and Conflict Resolution’ in Routledge
    Advances in International Political Economy’, IDRC, Ottawa, Canada
    e. Mlada Bukovansky, “Institutionalized Hypocrisy and the Politics of Agricultural Trade.” In
    Constructing the International Economy, edited by Rawi Abdelal and Mark Blyth and Craig
    Parsons (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2010): 68-90.
  8. Regional vs. Global Trade Governance
    a. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. Preferential Trade Agreements and the Global Trade Regime. In
    Global Political Economy.
    b. Sotiris Petropoulos, “The Emergence of the BRICS – Implications for Global Governance,”
    Journal of International and Global Studies, 4, No.2 (May 2013): 37-51. Daniel Epstein,
    “New Development? The BRICS Bank and the International System,” Harvard
    International Review (Fall: 2014-Winter 2015): 12-13.
    c. Stephen, Matthew D., 2014. ‘Rising powers, global capitalism and liberal global
    governance: A historical materialist account of the BRICs challenge’, European Journal of
    International Relations, 20(4): 912-938.
    Page 7 of 12
  9. Global Production & Corporations
    a. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. Multinational Corporations and Global Production. In Global
    Political Economy.
    b. Robert Gilpin, “The State and Multinationals.” In Robert Gilpin, Global Political Economy:
    Understanding the International Economic Order (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University
    Press, 2001): 278-304.
    c. Robert Cox, “Labour and Multinationals.” Foreign Affairs (January 1976).
    d. James C. W. Ahiakpor, “Multinational Corporations in the Third World: Predators or Allies
    in Economic Development?” Religion & Liberty 2, No.5 (1992).
  10. Global Development
    a. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. International Development. In Global Political Economy.
    b. Catherine Weaver, “The Meaning of Development: Constructing the World Bank’s Good
    Governance Agenda.” In Constructing the International Economy, edited by Rawi Abdelal
    and Mark Blyth and Craig Parsons (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2010): 47-67
    c. Amin, S. (2006, 03). The millennium development goals: A critique from the
    south. Monthly Review, 57, 1-15.
  11. Current Trends and Future Prospects
    a. Theodore H. Cohn. 2016. Current Trends in the Global Political Economy. In Global
    Political Economy.
    b. Bello W. The Far Right: Formidable but Not Unbeatable. Agrarian South: Journal of
    Political Economy. 2020; 9(3):388-398.
  12. Course Review & Case Study
    a. TBD
    Page 8 of 12
    Evaluation
    The following evaluation tools will be used to determine your final grades for this course.
    The Mid Term will cover all material up and until Reading Week. The take home exam will be
    composed of short answer and essay style questions. You will have 5 days to research and
    complete your responses and submit them via D2L.
    For the Research Paper assignment, students are to critically analyze a developing/emerging
    economy using one of the four theoretical perspectives introduced in the first half of the course.
    The purpose of the paper is to develop in depth knowledge of the political economy of one
    country struggling alongside a regional power. For this reason, countries such as Russia, United
    States, United Kingdom, Brazil, India, China and Japan are not permitted.
    The paper must be based on a strong and critical understanding of the history and challenges in
    that as they related to its political economy. The paper must clearly discuss the dominant forces
    in the country, framed as ideas, interests and institutions, and their impact on one of the
    following national policy issues – monetary, financial, trade, economic (corporate), development
    or regional security. The paper must assess existing and relevant published information about
    the country and the specific policy issue. Students will be expected to provide general context
    about the country and the paper must emphasize the relationship between power, state and
    society. When preparing this assignment, students might find it useful to take the perspective
    that they have been hired as a consultant by an international agency to critically analyze the
    country’s policy challenges and provide analysis, options and/or recommendations for policy
    change. The OECD among other multilateral organizations (WB, WTO, IMF and ADB), regularly
    publish ‘country profiles’, which might provide a useful guide for writing.
    The assignment can be organized any way students would like. Given the length of the paper,
    however, students should pay very close attention to the organization and presentation of their
    ideas. The challenge of the assignment is to communicate a lot of information about a particular
    country in a succinct manner – this skill is in high demand by local, regional, national and
    international organizations. Students are encouraged to use charts and tables in the appendix as
    possible, to free up writing space for analysis. Students must use a bare minimum of 5 peerreviewed sources in their paper. Students should make every effort to use journal articles for
    information. Websites of reputable organizations may also be used, but any information drawn
    from websites must be referenced in its entirety, including author of site, full website address,
    title of website, and date material retrieved. The author-date system of referencing is preferred,
    but consistency is most important. Students must choose a city they have not previously profiled
    or conducted research on for another class.
    Page 9 of 12
    Students should carefully consider the availability of historic and contemporary information on a
    potential city in advance of the due date of the outline, so that they can develop a structure.
    The Research Paper assignment has been set up in a staged format, to guide students and
    ensure that appropriate sources and structure are applied. Students should budget sufficient
    time to submit all components in a timely manner. As mentioned, all due dates for each
    component are specified in D2L.
    a) The outline should be prepared with a tentative thesis statement, along with the key
    components of the policy issues which you plan on exploring. It should also outline an
    analytical section where you talk about aspects of the policy challenge. The purpose the
    outline is to get you thinking about your paper and how you will structure it, setting you
    up for the research exercise.
    b) The annotated bibliography should consist of at least 5 to 7 citations (3 to 5 should be
    peer reviewed). For each citation, provide a summary of the abstract and a few sentences
    which reflects on how this article will contribute to your paper. Use proper citation format
    and be consistent throughout the bibliography. The annotated bibliography should
    contain a summary of how the article will be used in the final submission along with a
    brief critique from a policy studies perspective.
    c) The final submission should be well structured, well written, 10 to 12 pages long
    (excluding appendices), double spaced, and approximately 2,500 words
    Student Participation will be evaluated at the end of the year and will be based on weekly
    contributions to weekly discussion posts. Students are required to provide one response with
    references to the main thread and two responses to peer posts. All contributions should be
    comprehensive (one paragraph or two) and should cite at least 2 or 3 reputable references (peer
    reviewed). Students must learn to engage peers in a respectful manner, even though
    disagreements will emerge. This is a skill that students must refine in preparation for post
    graduate study or application in the field. Students cannot post copyrighted material.
    The Final Exam will cover all material post Reading Week. The take home exam will be composed
    of short answer and essay style questions. You will have 5 days to research and complete your
    responses and submit them via D2L.
    In all cases, students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the D2L Course Page.
    Page 10 of 12
    The following is the summary of components of your final mark, their weighting and due dates.
    Components of Grade Grade Due Dates
    Mid-Term Test 15% February 12
    Outline of Research Paper 5% February 26
    Annotated Bibliography for Research Paper 10% March 5
    Final Submission of Research Paper 20% March 19
    Final Exam (Take Home) 30% April 23
    Participation (Discussion Posts) 20% Weekly as per D2L
    University Policies
    Students are required to adhere to all relevant university policies found in their online course
    shell in D2L and/or on the following URL: http://ryerson.ca/senate/course-outline-policies
    Important Resources Available at Ryerson
    The Library provides research workshops and individual assistance. If the University is open,
    there is a Research Help desk on the second floor of the library, or go to Workshops.
    Student Learning Support offers group-based and individual help with writing, math, study
    skills, and transition support, as well as resources and checklists to support students as online
    learners.
    You can submit an Academic Consideration Request when an extenuating circumstance has
    occurred that has significantly impacted your ability to fulfill an academic requirement. You
    may always visit the Senate website and select the blue radial button on the top right hand side
    entitled: Academic Consideration Request (ACR) to submit this request).
    Please note that the Interim Provost/ Vice President Academic and Dean’s approved a COVID19 statement for Fall 2020/Winter 2021 related to academic consideration. This statement has
    been built into the Online Academic Consideration System and is also on the Senate website
    (www.ryerson.ca/senate):
    Policy 167: Academic Consideration for Fall 2020/Winter 2021 due to COVID-19: Students who
    miss an assessment due to cold or flu-like symptoms, or due to self-isolation, are currently not
    required to provide a health certificate. Other absences must follow Senate Policy 167:
    Academic Consideration.
    Page 11 of 12
    Also NOTE: Outside of COVID-19 symptoms, the new Policy 167: Academic Consideration does
    allow for a once per term academic consideration request without supporting documentation if
    the absence is less than 3 days in duration and is not for a final exam/final assessment. In both
    of those instances, documentation is required. For more information please see Senate Policy
    167: Academic Consideration.
    Ryerson COVID-19 Information and Updates for Students summarizes the variety of resources
    available to students during the pandemic.
    Familiarize yourself with the tools you will need to use for remote learning. The Continuity of
    Learning Guide for students includes guides to completing quizzes or exams in D2L or
    Respondus, using D2L Brightspace, joining online meetings or lectures, and collaborating with
    the Google Suite.
    Information on Copyright for Faculty and students.
    At Ryerson, we recognize that things can come up throughout the term that may interfere with
    a student’s ability to succeed in their coursework. These circumstances are outside of one’s
    control and can have a serious impact on physical and mental well-being. Seeking help can be a
    challenge, especially in those times of crisis. Below are resources we encourage all Ryerson
    community members to access to ensure support is reachable.
    https://www.ryerson.ca/mental-health-wellbeing
    If support is needed immediately, you can access these outside resources at anytime:
    Distress Line — 24/7 line for if you are in crisis, feeling suicidal or in need of emotional support
    (phone: 416–408–4357)
    Good2Talk- 24/7 hour line for postsecondary students (phone: 1-866-925-5454)
    (December 2020)
    Page 12 of 12
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